Rationing

Rationing in wartime Britain

Toronto physician Norman Harris joined the Canadian Army Medical Corps in 1916, and in 1918 was with a Canadian hospital in Seaford, in southern England. This card permitted him to purchase rationed food from a local shop.

Living on a soldier's pay

Through menu suggestions, nutrition tips, and budget advice, this booklet aimed to help a soldier's wife make the best use of her husband's assigned pay and dependents' allowance.

View PDF: Budgetting.pdf

"Thrift - Economy - Production"

Much of this booklet dealt with stretching wartime rations, but it also addressed thrift and economy in a more general sense, with tips on how to curb waste in the home.

View PDF: How to Live.pdf

Coupons for food

During the Second World War, Canadians became accustomed to rationing, which forced them to submit coupons in order to purchase commodities that the government had designated as scarce.

Temporary Ration Card

Temporary ration cards were issued to members of the armed forces on leave or visitors to Canada, such as tourists. The coupons had the same value as those in standard ration books but had no expiry date.

Food is Everybody's Business

This handbook describes Canada's Food Conservation Program and details the factors contributing to the increasing demand for domestic food production.

View PDF: Food Everybody.pdf

Make the most of your meat ration

This pamphlet emphasizes preparation and preservation methods to extend one's meat ration.

View PDF: Meat Ration.pdf

Temporary ration card

During the Second World War, Canadians became accustomed to carrying coupons for most commodities, such as this temporary ration card.

Rations for a soldier on leave

Soldiers on leave were issued with ration books so that they did not have to consume the rations of their civilian hosts.

Food rationing, 1944

This book of food ration coupons was issued to a Canadian soldier on leave in 1944.

View PDF: Ration book.pdf